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Grass in Green Meadow was first performed in Cafe Maldon on 19 July 2002, using a personalized form of Tai Chi to dramatize the performance and the textual imagery. This poem struck an emotional chord with all audiences during a short USA tour in 2003. Last performed at my retirement gig in Melbourne’s Botanic Gardens which was used to raise significant support for the freedom struggles in Tibet and West Papua, and for an orphanage in East Timor.
Grass in Green Meadow Chinese eat dog. Japanese eat whale. Les Français eat snail. Some fellas eat grub. Africans eat wildebeest. Latinoamericanos eat testicles of bull. Cowboys and Indians eat bison. Other fellas eat kangaroo. Dog eat lazy dog. Whale eat sea plankton. Snail eat plant. Grub eat leaf. Wildebeest eat grass. Bull eat grass. Bison eat grass. Kangaroo eat grass. Lazy dog eat no one. Sea plankton eat no one. Leaf eat no one. Plant eat no one. Grass in green meadow softens with gentle whisper of breeze and tears of Tibetan monks.
I’ve Never Been a Local I’ve never been a local don’t know what it means, no Members Only seats or blue-eyed cousin’s schemes. My door is open for the homeless food served for the less blest, I’ll father unfathered children and rise up with the oppressed. Critics Critics adopt cruelty as their cousin, hurl insults like sticky confetti, call their dogs Ridicule and Spite, chant Death! in the Colosseum, are absent at the Front Line and never pay their dues. Divine Right of Roosters If there is nobility to declare when Rooster strutts with regal pride, holding high his certificate of exaltation that lauds this patrician’s prosodic whims as crown jewels clamoured over by every hen, it’s for reasons only found in barnyard dirt and feudal DNA, this need to peck-peck-peck and cluck-cluck-cluck, for divine profundity is beyond dispute, even when cock-a-doodle-do is unpleasantly shrill and the message is explicitly as clear as mud.
JIM AUBREY - POETRY
A few poems written while living in Maldon, Victoria, in the early naughties  - collection Underbelly.
Grass in Green Meadow Chinese eat dog. Japanese eat whale. Les Français eat snail. Some fellas eat grub. Africans eat wildebeest. Latinoamericanos eat testicles of bull. Cowboys and Indians eat bison. Other fellas eat kangaroo. Dog eat lazy dog. Whale eat sea plankton. Snail eat plant. Grub eat leaf. Wildebeest eat grass. Bull eat grass. Bison eat grass. Kangaroo eat grass. Lazy dog eat no one. Sea plankton eat no one. Leaf eat no one. Plant eat no one. Grass in green meadow softens with gentle whisper of breeze and tears of Tibetan monks.
JIM AUBREY - POETRY
I’ve Never Been a Local I’ve never been a local don’t know what it means, no Members Only seats or blue-eyed cousin’s schemes. My door is open for the homeless food served for the less blest, I’ll father unfathered children and rise up with the oppressed. Critics Critics adopt cruelty as their cousin, hurl insults like sticky confetti, call their dogs Ridicule and Spite, chant Death! in the Colosseum, are absent at the Front Line and never pay their dues. Divine Right of Roosters If there is nobility to declare when Rooster strutts with regal pride, holding high his certificate of exaltation that lauds this patrician’s prosodic whims as crown jewels clamoured over by every hen, it’s for reasons only found in barnyard dirt and feudal DNA, this need to peck-peck-peck and cluck-cluck- cluck, for divine profundity is beyond dispute, even when cock-a-doodle-do is unpleasantly shrill and the message is explicitly as clear as mud.
A few poems written while living in Maldon, Victoria in the early naughties  - collection Underbelly.
Grass in Green Meadow was first performed in Cafe Maldon on 19 July 2002, using a personalized form of Tai Chi to dramatize the performance and the textual imagery. This poem struck an emotional chord with all audiences during a short USA tour in 2003. Last performed at my retirement gig in Melbourne’s Botanic Gardens which was used to raise significant support for the freedom struggles in Tibet and West Papua, and for an orphanage in East Timor.